Triton Db2 Geek

Confessions of a DB2 geek

IBM Gold Consultant Program and IBM Premier business Partner

Tag Archives: IBM Champion

DB2 Native REST API – Python

Published March 16th, 2018 - by

Introduction Whilst I haven’t used Python for a while, it has always been the playground for geeks. With it’s C-like look and feel and it’s huge array of extension libraries there’s very little it can’t do. I was prompted to refresh my acquaintance with Python by a colleague who’d been reading this blog chain – Continue Reading

Finding the access path for Columnar queries #3

Published March 13th, 2018 - by

In the first blog in this series ( Finding the access path for Columnar queries ) I was griping about not being able to see any detail in the explain plans for what DB2 is doing when you see a table scan (TBSCAN) of a column-organized table. I mention that each columnar table will have Continue Reading

DB2 Native REST API – Bonus Material – node.js

Published January 12th, 2018 - by

Introduction This is the 6th blog post in the (ahem) series of 5 on the DB2 for z/OS native REST interface. The previous entries are: DB2 Native REST API – Getting Started DB2 Native REST API – Creating Services DB2 Native REST API – A Sample REST Application DB2 Native REST API – Security DB2 Continue Reading

DB2 Native REST API 5 – BLOBs, CLOBs and Stored Procedures

Published December 1st, 2017 - by

Introduction In the previous blogs in this series, we’ve seen that the process of creating and consuming REST services with DB2 for z/OS V11 and V12 can be managed easily with PHP. In this blog, we’ll look at how we access LOB data, and finally how we use stored procedures to drive business logic.   Continue Reading

Finding the access path for Columnar queries #2

Published November 8th, 2017 - by

Usage Lists In my last blog ( http://db2geek.triton.co.uk/finding-access-path-columnar-queries ) I was reiterating the case for columnar data storage but bemoaning the lack of any means to see in the access path how the data is being retrieved. It merely shows as a table scan (TBSCAN) and you need to trust that what is going on Continue Reading

Finding the access path for Columnar queries

Published October 18th, 2017 - by

Columnar Data : how it works We’re probably all fairly familiar now with BLU acceleration and the advantages of storing analytical data in a columnar format. If not, and by way of a recap; what we can now do is return much smaller results sets to our analytical queries, in a highly-compressed format, thereby reducing Continue Reading

Do the Needful

Published July 19th, 2017 - by

So the last few blogs have been a bit negative and have been built around common expressions and assumptions that make my hackles rise (If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it, We’re Risk Averse and Best Practice). Now this is the blog with the positive spin, so it might seem strange that I’m hanging it Continue Reading

DB2 Native REST API – Security

Published May 2nd, 2017 - by

Introduction In the previous blogs on the DB2 Native REST API, we’ve talked about installation of the feature, how to create and drop services, and how to drive them. In this one, we’re going to have a look at how security works with REST – both in general HTTP/HTTPS terms, and from the point of Continue Reading

MVM Eases DB2 for z/OS Upgrade Anxiety

Published April 19th, 2017 - by

On 14th February 2017, IBM quietly announced a new software charging mechanism that could have some very positive implications for most System z sites – including DB2 for z/OS customers. MVM (Multi-Version Measurement) replaces the old Single Version Charging (SVC) arrangement, and promises to do away with many of the restrictions that IBM previously imposed Continue Reading

In-Line Optimization with V11.1

Published April 7th, 2017 - by

Sometimes you might find that the Optimizer has chosen an access path with which you don’t concur. It’s not that likely, as the DB2 Optimizer is one of the most sophisticated of its ilk, but it’s possible that you may know something that the optimizer doesn’t: if, for instance, a table has just had some Continue Reading

ZLOAD – Mid-Range Data LOAD into DB2 for z/OS

Published March 13th, 2017 - by

Introduction Most customers will have to deliver external data to DB2 for z/OS from time to time. For some, this will be a daily feed of volume data from clients and business partners, whilst for others it might be smaller mid-range generated test data. All will have faced the usual challenges delivering data from mid-range Continue Reading

We’re Risk Averse

Published March 3rd, 2017 - by

I’m in danger of sounding like an episode of Grumpy Old Men, but this is another of those expressions that grates a bit for a database support consultant. In my previous blog (If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it) I mentioned one expression that stores up problems in the long run. This often strikes me Continue Reading

2017: A year for DB2 11.1

Published February 22nd, 2017 - by

If your databases are on DB2 9.7 or DB2 10.1, then September 30, 2017 is a date that should be at the forefront of your mind. Both DB2 9.7 and DB2 10.1 go out of support on this date. As you start thinking about your upgrade plans to either DB2 10.5 or better still DB2 Continue Reading

If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it

Published January 31st, 2017 - by

Ever heard this expression? One of my least favourites. Flip it over and express it the other way around: Wait until it breaks and then try and fix it I don’t think that is something you seriously want to consider in a Production environment and yet it is something we come across as database support Continue Reading

DB2 11 for z/OS Comes of Age

Published March 2nd, 2016 - by

It’s easy to think of DB2 11 for z/OS as still being the new kid on the block, but it actually became Generally Available back in October 2013 – Miley Cyrus was getting plenty of airtime with Wrecking Ball and the movie Gravity was expertly inducing vertigo in audiences all around the world. New releases Continue Reading

Restore Transport option – mix and match your schemas (Part 1)

Published January 22nd, 2016 - by

I recently had a request from a client to help them build a database with a set of objects from two physical databases and provide a third ‘merged’ database. They’d already established that using 2 successive RESTORE commands with the TABLESPACE option was going to fail (SQL2560N : The target database is not identical to the Continue Reading